Voltlog #114 – Aneng AN8008 Probably The Best $25 Multimeter

Today we are taking a look at the ANENG AN8008 multimeter. This product was sent to me by banggood.com free of charge for the purpose of this review. They also sent me an ESD mat, because I have two benches in here in only one of them had an ESD mat so I needed a second one.

Links for the products shown in this video are below:

  • Aneng AN8008 Multimeter Link
  • ESD Mat Link

Voltlog #99 – Samsung TV Power Supply Board Repair MK32P5T BN44-00213A

In this video I am repairing a power supply board from a Samsung TV. The part number for the power supply board is MK32P5T (BN44-00213A). The TV was showing the stand-by led but refused to turn on. It turns out this was a common problem with a simple fix.

Here are links to some of the tools used in this video:

Voltlog #93 – Bluetooth Receiver Weekend Update

This week I build a DIY bluetooth 4.0 audio receiver. I used the CSR8635 bluetooth module, a recycled lithium battery cell that I got out of an old laptop, a TP4056 battery charging & protection IC and a DIY PCB I made myself.

Here are links to these items if you plan to build one yourself:

Or you can just buy a ready-made bluetooth receiver.

 

Voltlog #86 – Limiting Iphone USB Charging To 500mA

It all started a few days ago when I was talking with a friend and he suggested, since we do most of our phone charging at night, why not charge them at a lower rate for increase battery life. As you may know, when you increase the charging current, charging happens faster at the expense of losing battery life over time, you get fewer battery cycles before it starts losing its capacity.

So I decided to build this small gadget, that goes between the usb output of my charger and the usb plug from my charging cable. In my case I have an Iphone and the charging current can be limited to 500mA by having a set of resistors on the USB data lines.

Links for the parts used to build the project:

Voltlog #82 – DIY Adjustable Analog DC Electronic Load

In this episode I am building an analog adjustable dc load with parts easily obtainable from ebay and banggood. The advantage of such a dc load is that you can understand how it works, modify or repair it if necessary far easier than you would with a digital one. I was able to push mine up to 60W dissipation, but it is recommend to stay under 50W to protect the mosfet.

Here is a list with links to the parts used in this project: